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Lou Bernard “Barney” Voigt         


Date/place of birth:
18 June 1915
Olnay, Illinois

Date/place of death:
4 March 1953, Bethesda, Maryland

Relationship to the college:
Instructor of Landscape Architecture and Botany
September 1942-September 1943

Profession:

Landscape Architect
 

 

 


Lou Bernard Voigt received his B.S. in 1939 from the University of Illinois and then enrolled at the School of Design at Harvard University where he receive his Master of Landscape Architecture degree. He visited Black Mountain College for a month in June 1942. Before returning to Black Mountain in August, he did work for a Christopher Tunnard, Dan Kiley and the firm of Stonorov and Kahn on a defense housing project. He returned to Black Mountain in August to make a study of the landscaping and farming issues at Lake Eden. On August 30 he gave a talk at the college on “Land Use Problems” and showed his pen and ink drawings of plans for Lake Eden. In September he was appointed Instructor in Landscape Architecture and Botany from September 1942-September 1943. At Black Mountain he worked with Kocher and Josef Albers on a permanent landscaping plan. He also taught courses in Botany, Plant Physiology, Plant Ecology, and Landscape Architecture.

During the war, Voigt worked with the firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on site planning development for atomic plant installations at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and did work for the Office of Strategic Services and the Department of State in Washington, D.C. From 1948-50, while employed by the Planning Division of the National Capital Parks, he did designs for parks, squares and circles in the Washington area. After 1950, he was engaged as a consultant by Charles M. Goodman Associates in Washington, D.C. Before his death in 1953, he worked with Goodman on two postwar Washington-area residential developments of modern houses, Hammond Wood and Hollin Hills. He did the plantings at Hammond Wood and worked with Dan Kiley and Eric Paepcke on the landscape design at Hollin Hills.
 

   

This biography was funded by a grant from the Graham Foundation for a study of architecture at Black Mountain College.

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